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Friday, May 19
 

7:30am

Breakfast & Open Networking
Speakers

Friday May 19, 2017 7:30am - 8:30am
Room 6 - Constitution

7:30am

Registration Opens
Speakers

Friday May 19, 2017 7:30am - 8:30am
Ballroom

8:00am

Meet & Greet
Speakers

Friday May 19, 2017 8:00am - 8:25am
Room 5 - Independence

8:30am

Welcome & Opening Keynote "UX: The Serendipitous Career"

One of the questions I get most when chatting with people who want to break into the UX field is: how did you get here? Over the years of telling my own career story and listening to many others, I realized most of us found this field rather serendipitously. Some happened to be a participant in a usability study, others went to grad school for one career and discovered another. In this brief keynote, I’ll chat about my own & others’ serendipitous moments and how we as practitioners can and should help others have their own.


Speakers
avatar for Dan Berlin

Dan Berlin

VP, Experience Research, Mad*Pow
After seven years providing technical support for hard-to-use interfaces, Dan found his calling when he sat as a participant in a usability study. He quit his job and enrolled in the MBA+MS in Human Factors in Information Design program at Bentley University. After graduating from Bentley, Dan spent two years at an interactive agency performing usability and neuromarketing research studies. For the latter research, Dan investigated eye tracking... Read More →


Friday May 19, 2017 8:30am - 9:00am
Ballroom

9:15am

The Wallflower’s Guide to Networking IRL
The Wallflower’s Guide to Networking IRL (In Real Life) is the next installation in the Wallflower Guide Series. The Wallflower Guides ([Author 1] the Wallflower and [Author 2] her Rock Star Spirit Animal) are back this year to co¬ntinue teaching career soft skills for the UX nerd. Last year, we talked about presentation skills in our highly successful workshop “The Wallflower’s Guide to Rocking a Presentation” in which we gave tips and tricks to boost your confidence before your next presentation.

This year, we’re taking those skills to the next level by practicing micro interactions IRL (In Real Life). If you groan at the word “networking” this talk is for you. If you are a rock star networker already, come and demonstrate your schmoozing skillz during this interactive workshop. You’ll get some new tools to conquer the UXPA Boston after-conference networking event. We’ll see you there!

Speakers
avatar for Kelly Moeller

Kelly Moeller

Training and Development Specialist, Aquent/Vitamin T
As a Certified Facilitator and Corporate Trainer with 12 years of making great connections happen, Kelly is an advocate, a matchmaker, a bundle of energy, a storyteller – and most importantly a relationship builder. Kelly is very well-versed in public speaking, giving presentations, and coaching to performance. This is her fifth time presenting at UXPA!


Friday May 19, 2017 9:15am - 10:00am
Room 5 - Independence

9:15am

Data visualizations that expand your visual literacy
Many data displays are compromised representations that may limit our ability to understand the full story or lead us to shortsighted conclusions. Between multiple screen displays, tables of data, and basic charts that only show a limited perspective of the data, we are often left with subpar tools to combine and analyze data. Collectively, we know we need to improve our data experiences, as well as our ability to see the main issues, discover the hidden details, make connections, and compare the top ideas. Increasing amounts of data only heighten the need to do more with the data we have and ensure our decisions are well considered. As a result, we also need better methods to navigate data and extract multiple questions from datasets so that our follow up queries are only a click away.

Julie Rodriguez draws upon examples from her book Visualizing Financial Data to show you how to turn your raw data into meaningful information. Along the way, Julie shares new visual design methods that provide a greater perspective of the data through embedded context, adjustments to commonly used charts, and new chart types that are easier to read and comprehend.

Speakers

Friday May 19, 2017 9:15am - 10:00am
Room 2 - Backbay C/D

9:15am

Practical Accessibility: Advice from the front lines
Accessibility evaluation and design can be daunting, even for those who believe that designing for inclusion is a moral and legal imperative.

The practical steps to ensure product and service accessibility can appear complicated. There are formal and informal sets of accessibility guidelines which require interpretation to apply. Technologies evolve, bringing both better assistive technology support and more opportunities to break existing solutions.

Moreover, key issues are emotionally loaded as advocates fight for human rights, designers strive to innovate, and corporations seek to maximize profits and avoid litigation. The demand for accessibility support accelerates globally as individuals shift into their elder years in unprecedented numbers.

The bottom line, however, is that Accessibility design and evaluation needn’t be difficult or confusing. Processes can be learned, guidelines can be clarified, and ultimately Accessibility is simply part of UX. This panel will provide a reality check on the current state of accessibility, offer advice from experts regarding setting reasonable expectations and sharing practical advice for success.

We will base the discussion on real-world scenarios to allow us to frame and explore a number of critical topics. For example:
How to interpret accessibility guidelines, especially for new technologies
  • Effective accessibility evaluation techniques
  • APIs and better developer tools for automating aspects of accessibility
  • Coping with legal realities and the threat of lawsuits
  • Forthcoming changes in ADA and “Section 508” federal standards 
  • Collaborating with designers, advocates, thought leaders, and other internal business stakeholders
Bring your own stories and questions as our panel of experts share their experiences and debate the most effective ways to make great accessible products and services.

Speakers
avatar for Chris Hass

Chris Hass

Sr. VP of Experience Design, Mad*Pow
Chris is the SVP of Experience Design at Mad*Pow | | Chris brings thirteen years of experience in human factors research, user interface design and accessibility in the development of innovative user experience products and programs to Mad*Pow. Chris has unique expertise conducting human factors research with persons who have physical and cognitive disabilities. Chris also has extensive experience designing information architecture and... Read More →
avatar for Chris LaRoche

Chris LaRoche

UX Consultant, MIT
UX geek, researcher, & lecturer. All things Canada


Friday May 19, 2017 9:15am - 10:00am
Room 4 - Liberty B/C

9:15am

Usability Validation Testing of Medical Devices and Software
The U.S. FDA and international regulatory bodies require usability testing of medical devices, products, software, and systems as part of their overall validation. Manufacturers must demonstrate that all potential use-related hazards have been identified, prioritized, and mitigated. The method for demonstrating this is human factors/usability engineering (HF/UE) validation testing. However, the way we conduct these studies is in many ways different from the way we conduct studies of non-medical products and systems.

This topic is relevant to the Boston UX community given the convergence of consumer and medical devices, as well as the rise of wearable technologies and the apps that interact with them. This presentation will cover the key aspects of HF/UE validation (a.k.a. ‘summative’) testing and what the FDA expects in the final HF/UE summary report.

Importantly, this session will consist of half presentation and half Q&A, with the audience driving the discussion toward current issues, questions, and challenges that are relevant to them.

Speakers
BL

Beth Loring

Principal, Loring Human Factors, LLC


Friday May 19, 2017 9:15am - 10:00am
Room 1 - Backbay A/B

9:15am

UX strategy starts with Business strategy
Many UX strategy discussions focus on processes such as Lean UX, Design Sprints, Design Thinking, etc. This talk will focus on other aspects of UX strategies that are less frequently discussed. By better understanding these other factors, we, UX practitioners, can deliver higher value to the organization by focusing our efforts on what really counts for a business to be successful.

For example, smaller community banks or credit unions are competing against bigger banks with a lot more resources. How should these smaller banks think about UX? Is it a realistic goal for them to try to outperform larger banks and provide a better user experience along every customer touch point? In my opinion, it is not a realistic goal, and smaller banks need to focus their resources where it most counts. The reason many customers choose to take their business to the smaller banks is often because of the personalized service they receive when visiting a branch. Therefore, a better strategy would be for the community bank to allocate more resources to employee training focused on optimizing their sociability and customer engagement skills.

What other outside factors are we forgetting to talk about?

Speakers
DJ

David Juhlin

Senior UX Researcher, PTC


Friday May 19, 2017 9:15am - 10:00am
Room 3 - Republic A/B

10:15am

Mentoring
Speakers

Friday May 19, 2017 10:15am - 11:00am
Room 5 - Independence

10:15am

Designing for multitasking and interruption-intensive environments
People talk about "the interruption culture" in today’s workplace. Research shows that people switch activities on average every three minutes and five seconds. All these distractions not only hurt productivity, they also have negative emotional effects, including higher stress and bad mood. As designers, we can help reduce some of the negative impacts of constant interruption by designing applications that support how a user may need to multitask.

In this session, we will focus on several aspects of how to design for the reality of multitasking and interruption, including: how to reduce the time it takes to move between tasks, when and how to disturb the user smartly, and how to support a user’s focus on a given task. In addition to sharing examples, we will discuss cognitive theories supporting the principles presented.


Friday May 19, 2017 10:15am - 11:00am
Room 2 - Backbay C/D

10:15am

Are you incorporating metrics into your journey maps? Well you should be.
Journey maps are not a new concept. Traditionally, researchers use qualitative insights to tell the story of a customer’s journey to inform design. However, this approach doesn’t always give visibility into the entire picture. That’s where quantitative data comes in.

Analytics and metrics can easily be integrated into the traditional journey map structure, providing additional insight into customer behavior and business impact. By matching the right data with each touchpoint, we can better understand the gravity of pain points, the business impact of new opportunities and how a customer’s experience impacts their overall satisfaction.


Friday May 19, 2017 10:15am - 11:00am
Room 4 - Liberty B/C

10:15am

You can have it both ways: Fast and unbiased usability research
Do you dream of a future when computers have truly replaced humans, and research analysis is almost instantaneous? Reality check: it’s not going to happen. Turning all that data into information will always require some difficult thinking – by a real human. But rapid research means less time for analysis, and hastily drawn conclusions are more prone to bias. How do we address the need for speed demanded of us while retaining confidence in our findings?

In this presentation, I’ll share tips for increasing the efficiency of our research without sacrificing quality. We’ll start with a toolbox of usability measures that make planning a study faster and easier. We’ll talk about designing data collection systems that facilitate analysis, and reduce the time spent reading through notes or re-watching videos. Finally, we’ll let computers save us time by doing the math, exposing hidden patterns, and rendering beautiful visualizations.

Speakers
avatar for Eva Kaniasty

Eva Kaniasty

UX Consultant, Red Pill UX
Eva Kaniasty is the founder of Red Pill UX, LLC, a consultancy providing user experience strategy, research and interaction design in the Boston area. Eva has improved user experiences in a range of industries, including healthcare, education, financial, and software. She received her Master's in Human Factors from Bentley University in 2007, sits on the board of UXPA Boston, and is a repeat presenter at local and national conferences.


Friday May 19, 2017 10:15am - 11:00am
Room 1 - Backbay A/B

10:15am

Behavior-Driven Scenarios for UX Teams
Software engineers have a big UX secret: over the last ten years, they've worked out an effective way to (1) describe a user's expectations of what a product should do and (2) ensure that they meet those expectations. Even better: they designed it for non-technical team members to participate as equals.

Maybe user stories are enough to guide your Agile team. Maybe you convey every detail through fully interactive prototypes. If not, it's time to learn about Behavior-Driven Development (BDD).

With BDD, a designer can take an ordinary UX scenario, add a touch of syntactic structure, and make it easier for a development team to understand, implement, and test:

Scenario: When a patient achieves a goal, do something special Given a patient care plan with a health goal defined When the patient views her care plan And the patient marks her health goal as achieved Then we should notify her care team of her success And display some celebratory confetti

In this workshop, we will take a real product feature from contextual scenario to behavioral scenario to automated test (in a live mobile browser)—and learn how to integrate the Behavior-Driven approach into a product design process.

Along the way, we'll address these topics:
  • The basic syntax and best practices of behavioral scenarios
  • Engaging a multidisciplinary team in the writing & review process
  • Bringing order and reliability to sometimes-messy iterative development
  • How developers use automated testing to bring your scenarios to life

In the end, participants should see how the Behavior-Driven approach improves product quality in both the short and long run and makes the entire team happier in the process.

Speakers
avatar for Jonathan Abbett

Jonathan Abbett

VP of User Experience, ACT.md
Jonathan Abbett, an interaction designer and software developer, believes deeply that designers should embed themselves meaningfully within software teams as leaders and partners. For 15 years, Jonathan has designed and built systems for clinicians, researchers, patients, and families at startups, hospitals, and a global pharmaceutical company. Now, as VP of User Experience at ACT.md, Jonathan is addressing the challenges of complex care... Read More →


Friday May 19, 2017 10:15am - 11:00am
Room 3 - Republic A/B

11:15am

10-minute Talks
Speakers

Friday May 19, 2017 11:15am - 12:00pm
Room 4 - Liberty B/C

11:15am

Sponsored Session
Speakers
avatar for UserZoom

UserZoom

UserZoom


Friday May 19, 2017 11:15am - 12:00pm
Room 5 - Independence

11:15am

Mini-SPRINT: Arriving at High Quality Design Solutions in a Day
Arriving at high quality solutions is a hard proposition in the best of times. Designers often find ourselves pressed against deadlines while we seek to clarify problems and set appropriate expectations. This situation is further complicated by the fact that most of us work with globally distributed team, and while virtual collaboration tools certainly help bridge time zones and geographic divide, there is no true substitute to in-person problem solving. But, bringing people in one central place is just half the battle, the challenge then becomes how to ensure that the limited in-person sessions are productive? More specifically, how do you channel people’s opinions, understanding and ideas into productive output that gets at solving the problem at hand? Enter Mini-SPRINT.

Mini-SPRINT is a one day session focused at producing high quality solutions that can be further validated with customers and / or internal stakeholders. Mini-SPRINT is based on the five-day design session used by team at Google Ventures and have been published in the book SPRINT.

This talk will showcase how I designed and operationalized Mini-SPRINT. I will talk about the session’s structure, the results obtained at the end of the day and lessons learned after conducting this session. I will conclude the talk with specific examples of how design ideas from the Mini-SPRINT continues to influence our design solutions.

This talk is primarily geared for designers and leaders who tend to run/facilitate design sessions, workshops with other designers or cross-functional team members.

Speakers
avatar for Ranjan Bhattarai

Ranjan Bhattarai

Lead User Experience Architect, Rapid7


Friday May 19, 2017 11:15am - 12:00pm
Room 2 - Backbay C/D

11:15am

Questioning Picture-in-Picture: Why Showing the Participant May Not Be Such a Great Idea After All

For as long as I’ve been doing usability testing, it’s been generally assumed that displaying video of the participant to the observers--usually in a small picture-in-picture window--is a good thing. This participant picture-in-picture (PPIP) video theoretically increases observer empathy and helps convince even the most stubborn executive that their product makes users miserable. And as generating PPIP became easier--thanks to ubiquitous webcams and slick screen sharing software--it’s become more or less standard practice.


But after years of teaching people how to do usability testing, I’ve come to feel that showing observers the participant's face may not necessarily be a good thing. In fact, I think it's often an unnecessary and detrimental distraction.

In the past when I’ve expressed this opinion I’ve always prefaced it by saying “I know I may be wrong about this, because I seem to be the only person who feels this way.”

But when I started telling some friends that I was thinking of doing this presentation, I was surprised to find that some people in the field whose opinions I respect the most felt exactly the same way I did. As one of them said,

“My own main issue about showing the participant is that for me it really takes away from being able to concentrate on the interface and what the user is DOING and SAYING in relation to it. It’s hard to keep concentrating on this anyway and easy to get distracted, so why furnish a distraction that is NOT the main concern of the test?”

In this session, I’m going to try to make the case for not showing PPIP video to people overserving your usability tests.

As always, you can make up your own mind when we’re done.

Speakers
avatar for Steve Krug

Steve Krug

Lazy Writer, Advanced Common Sense
What to know about me? | | Well, I've been a usability consultant for nearly 30 years, and have enjoyed teaching usability testing to hundreds of people in person. But most people know me from my "bestselling" book (over 500,000 served, as McDonald's® would say) Don't Make Me Think, which has turned out to be most people’s introduction to usability and UX these days. And some people even know my other book, Rocket Surgery Made Easy: The... Read More →


Friday May 19, 2017 11:15am - 12:00pm
Room 1 - Backbay A/B

11:15am

Go Beyond Digital: Elevate Your UX with Service Design Thinking
Today, users expect great, consistent experiences with brands – regardless of the context or technology they are using. The entire customer experience, including both offline and digital touchpoints, is what builds customer loyalty.

As UX designers, we often focus too narrowly on the digital experience of the end product. But it’s not all about digital! Widening the lens beyond digital UX to include the entire ecosystem of actions is a much more impactful and meaningful way to design for the user.

Service Design provides a unique, holistic way of considering all touchpoints in the customer journey. And it’s not all that different from the design thinking that UX designers apply to digital products today! Service design uses many of the same principles, design thinking, methods, and tools – just at a much more intersectional and macro-level way.

This session will provide an overview of service design, why it’s important for UX designers, and how to start thinking about it. Using a case study of a non-profit looking to increase customer satisfaction, we’ll explore the challenges, lessons learned, and opportunities that service design provided.

Speakers
avatar for Chi Pham

Chi Pham

User Experience Designer, Effective
I am a UX Designer at EffectiveUI, based in Denver, CO. I firmly believe in the power of holistic solutions, across all digital and nondigital touchpoints. Passion drives me to learn more, to creatively, holistically and strategically problem solve, and to compassionately solve the important issues of today’s world.


Friday May 19, 2017 11:15am - 12:00pm
Room 3 - Republic A/B

12:00pm

Lunch
Speakers

Friday May 19, 2017 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Room 6 - Constitution

12:00pm

Table Topics
Speakers

Friday May 19, 2017 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Room 5 - Independence

1:00pm

Networking
Speakers

Friday May 19, 2017 1:00pm - 1:45pm
Room 5 - Independence

1:00pm

A Designers Guide to Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning
AI, data science, machine learning and analytics are changing the world - and the world of design won’t be immune to this transformation. Big data and tools such as machine learning can provide the types of insights that user researchers and user experience designers have always dreamed of.

This data-driven approach allows user experience designers to better target areas for further investigation and uncover what drives these behaviours, ultimately designing better products and services.

Leveraging the power of AI & data requires designers to get a basic understanding of the technology, in order to be able to adapt design practices accordingly. As an audience member, you’ll leave the talk with an understanding of what AI and machine learning mean to designers, and how to evolve your practice accordingly.

Speakers
avatar for Ramy Nassar

Ramy Nassar

Managing Director, Architech


Friday May 19, 2017 1:00pm - 1:45pm
Room 4 - Liberty B/C

1:00pm

Baffled by Brilliance: Machine Learning as the next great UX challenge
There’s a well-known WC Fields quote, “If you can't dazzle them with brilliance, baffle them with bullshit.” When it comes to Machine Learning (ML), there can be a tendency to dazzle with bullshit, to make grandiose claims about the capabilities of magical algorithms. Yet attempts to convey more correctly the real brilliance of Machine Learning often leave people baffled. This can be looked at as a UX problem: there is an enormous gap in understanding between those designing ML solutions and those using them, and it is a more fundamental gap than exists naturally between designers and users of other software systems.

This talk will be both an introduction to Machine Learning and an examination of why it presents a unique challenge to UX professionals.

Speakers

Friday May 19, 2017 1:00pm - 1:45pm
Room 2 - Backbay C/D

1:00pm

Best check yourself! Dealing with cognitive biases in user research
You spend hours arranging, conducting and analyzing research sessions; how do you get the most insightful results from them? To be great user researchers, we need to avoid falling into mental traps that constrain our thinking and keep us from finding the most useful insights in our research.

Drawing on my background in cognitive psychology and my time as a user experience researcher, I’ll:
  • lay out several “cognitive biases” that user experience researchers should note as they plan, conduct and analyze research
  • detail strategies for countering those biases
  • and present several case studies about places where researchers have fallen into (and successfully avoided cognitive biases)

Participants will walk away both with a better understanding of our biases and a few simple tactics for avoiding them at each phase of the research process.

Speakers
avatar for Colin MacArthur

Colin MacArthur

User Experience Researcher, 18F, U.S. General Services Administration
Colin MacArthur is a user experience researcher at 18F, an office within the General Services Administration that brings human centered design practices to U.S. government agencies. He combines background in psychology and experience as a UX researcher to identify ways organizations can make their research practices robust and rigorous.


Friday May 19, 2017 1:00pm - 1:45pm
Room 1 - Backbay A/B

1:00pm

UX Neat, Agile Chaser – Your step-by-step guide for blending UX and Agile in a busy development organization
We consistently hear that good UX practices and scrum don’t mix. We disagree. Over the past 5 years, we’ve evolved an agile scrum process for producing UX deliverables on time and within constraints. Our process allows us to meet project requirements and deadlines and fits in UX best practices such as: use of personas, iterative design, and user validation. The best part is… we’re going to share it with you. We will share these parts of our UX Agile mixology:
  • Step by step detail on our scrum practices, including a process flow diagram for how we integrate with the development lifecycle
  • Our special blend of story patterns that fit varying needs that audience members can take home and mix into to their own working environments
  • How we structure our UX Team, including the secret ingredients in our team’s success


Friday May 19, 2017 1:00pm - 1:45pm
Room 3 - Republic A/B

2:00pm

Sponsored Session
Speakers

Friday May 19, 2017 2:00pm - 2:45pm
Room 5 - Independence

2:00pm

The Art and Science of Applying Behavioral Economics to Digital Health Design
If you design health behavior change interventions, you’ve probably heard of behavioral economics. Concepts from behavioral economics—often called “nudges”—can inform incentive design, participation strategies, and the feature sets of interventions with the goal of impacting behavior to achieve positive outcomes.

However, many behavioral economic-inspired features don’t achieve their desired goals. Reasons why not include:
  • Not all practitioners share an evidence-based understanding of how behavioral economics works, and therefore may misapply concepts;
  • Users are more responsive to different behavioral economics concepts at different points in the behavior change experience, so an experience map must be layered into the design process;
  • And individual differences also influence which behavioral economics concepts most affect behavior, so a deep understanding of the user is required.
In this talk, we’ll review several of the core concepts in behavioral economics. We’ll share examples of how they can be misapplied in digital design and explain why they are not effective in those contexts.

But don’t fret; we’ll also share best practices for applying these concepts based on the evidence-based literature. We’ll dive into how human-centered design—understanding the user’s needs and context—can save the day. We consider the user’s experience with an intervention over time and identify critical milestones and touchpoints. At each stage, the user’s needs change, and as a result, the particular behavioral economics principles that most effectively influence behavior do too. We’ll add nuance by considering the different “flavors” of features that can be used depending on the user’s psychological and environmental status.

You’ll learn:
  • Strategies for evaluating longitudinal user needs in health interventions
  • Options for better understanding a user’s psychographic profile
  • Tactics to select the most effective behavioral economics technique(s) to effect change for specific users at specific timepoints
  • Best practices to translate concepts to intervention features

Speakers
avatar for Amy Bucher

Amy Bucher

Behavior Change Design Director, Mad*Pow
Amy Bucher, Ph.D., is the Behavior Change Design Director at Mad*Pow. In her work, Amy focuses on crafting engaging and motivating solutions that help people change their behavior in meaningful and positive ways. Previously she worked with CVS Health as a Senior Strategist for their Digital Specialty Pharmacy, and with Johnson & Johnson Health and Wellness Solutions Group as Associate Director of Behavior Science. Amy spent many years working... Read More →


Friday May 19, 2017 2:00pm - 2:45pm
Room 2 - Backbay C/D

2:00pm

Make it Fast: Delivering UX Research to Agile Teams
One of the biggest challenges facing UX designers working with agile teams is providing user research in a quick, effective way. Design sprints take less time than in the past and development makes it difficult to slip user feedback into the mix. Traditional research takes time to design, set up, recruit for, run and analyze. Since that could span several sprints, “traditional” research simply doesn’t work in today’s rapid pace development, and the user experience suffers. Many organizations are tackling this challenge.

We’ve brought together 4 panelists who are using methods to address the issue of rapid UX research. Panelists come from both in-house teams and agencies. We’ll share our approaches and offer practical advice about how to do it, why it works and what could be improved. We’ll cover both unmoderated tests and more traditional moderated tests. You’ll learn some new approaches and get a chance to ask questions or share your own experiences.


Friday May 19, 2017 2:00pm - 2:45pm
Room 4 - Liberty B/C

2:00pm

Techniques to Ease Non-Researchers into Raw Data Analysis
As researchers, we sometimes take for granted that studying human behavior can be elusive to non-research stakeholders. Ambiguous, subjective, and difficult to interpret into insights, human-centered data requires expertise and practice to analyze meaningfully. While researchers are equipped to manage the ethereal process of raw data analysis, it can be difficult for non-researchers to understand.

A challenge many researchers face is describing the validity of their findings. Because human-centered data is more likely to originate from anecdotes, behaviors, and emotions, the steps it takes to translate them into findings is more of an art than a science. Hermeneutics, the interpretive processes of understanding, require significant study and appreciation to be executed properly. What many non-research stakeholders struggle to internalize is how to consider these unmeasurable processes of knowing.

The presenters will talk about a 5-step approach they use to introduce clients to human-centered data, and how they usher clients through the analysis process. Attendees will learn how and when to introduce non-research stakeholders into the broader research discussion, and how to directly engage with them at the point of crafting themes and insights.

Speakers
avatar for Meena Kothandaraman

Meena Kothandaraman

Customer Experience Strategist, twig+fish research practice
I love researching human behavior! | If you have any interest in what makes studying people so fascinating, or want to talk about why it is so hard to run research studies at companies (and some ways to make things easier for you as a researcher or consumer of research output)... catch me for a drink and we can strike up a great conversation! | I also am happy to share ideas about being an independent UX'er for a long time, and the... Read More →
avatar for Zarla Ludin

Zarla Ludin

experience researcher, twig+fish research practice
Bringing an anthropological perspective to every project, Zarla is passionate about helping people build stronger connections with each other. Zarla's expertise lies in her ability to help people reveal, reflect, and describe the parts of life everyone takes for granted. Zarla has a knack for helping teams access their natural curiosity and bring a more empathic lens into their work. | | Prior to twig+fish, Zarla was Director of Insights... Read More →


Friday May 19, 2017 2:00pm - 2:45pm
Room 1 - Backbay A/B

2:00pm

Operationalizing Website Accessibility A Strategic Approach to Employing Universal Design Principles Within Your Organization
Even to this day, the internet is riddled with websites that are not fully accessible to people with disabilities, even though laws in the US require equal access to all users. And for a variety of reasons, very few organizations have spent the time to fully understand web accessibility best practices and to put measures in place to ensure it becomes a key component of their digital product development. But as accessibility-related lawsuits continue to accelerate, the US population continues to age and access from mobile devices outpaces desktop, website accessibility will become more important than ever.

This presentation will arm its attendees with a practical approach to raising awareness, dispelling myths, establishing a roadmap and executing a strategy for making their website accessible to a larger group of people, regardless of their age or ability. It is also filled with useful tips to help UX practitioners break through silos and partner with other internal teams, from marketing to IT to legal, to begin building a culture of universal design within an organization.

Speakers

Friday May 19, 2017 2:00pm - 2:45pm
Room 3 - Republic A/B

2:45pm

Coffee Break
Speakers

Friday May 19, 2017 2:45pm - 3:15pm
Room 6 - Constitution

3:15pm

10-minute Talks
Speakers

Friday May 19, 2017 3:15pm - 4:00pm
Room 4 - Liberty B/C

3:15pm

Mentoring
Speakers

Friday May 19, 2017 3:15pm - 4:00pm
Room 5 - Independence

3:15pm

Designing in Healthcare for High Stress Situations
Late one evening, with only a few employees still in the office, we received a frantic phone call. One of our users, the parent of a complex pediatric patient, was calling our support line from the Emergency Department (ED). His son was being rushed into the hospital, and he needed to share his care plan with the doctors in the ED. On his cell phone, in the busy ED, with his son's life in danger, he could not remember his password, or remember the sharing instructions he had been given. He was also not a native English speaker, and he couldn't understand the error messages about his login issues.

As designers, our natural inclination is to delight users, so we don't always consider what happens in a time of crisis. A solution that performs well in a relaxed, low-stress testing session may have unforeseen UX challenges. We have experienced this first-hand at act.MD, in partnership with the Massachusetts Alliance for Complex Care (MACC) Collaborative Consultative Care Coordination (4C) Program, a service at Boston Medical Center and Baystate Medical Center. Multidisciplinary care teams at MACC 4C support pediatric patients with complex medical and social needs, and the families that care for them. Our goal was to design an interface for patients and families to share their complex care plan with physicians outside of act.MD.

This talk will cover our experience throughout the process, including:
  • Our initial user research, design, and testing.
  • Lessons from customer support staff helping users in high-stress situations
  • Increasing empathy for our users through Live Action Role Playing (LARP)
  • Our takeaways, and how the experience impacted both our current design and our process for future work

Speakers
avatar for Katelyn Hurley

Katelyn Hurley

Senior Program Manager, ACT.md
Katie Hurley, a public health practitioner, has spent the last several years working in health programming, implementations and evaluation in low-resourced settings. As a Senior Program Manager at ACT.md, Katie helps innovative programs come to life by leveraging ACT.md's technology to streamline communication, and improve the health care experience for complex patients, their caregivers, and care teams.
avatar for Rachel Roppolo

Rachel Roppolo

User Interface Engineer, Act.md
Rachel Roppolo, a user interface engineer, has spent the last 8 years building software that connects resources and teams working to achieve a common goal.  She has worked on software for enterprise team collaboration, knowledge management, customer relationship management, and now team-based healthcare coordination.  As a member of the UX team at Act.md, Rachel uses her software engineering and UX background to help innovative teams of... Read More →


Friday May 19, 2017 3:15pm - 4:00pm
Room 2 - Backbay C/D

3:15pm

Using frameworks to manage ethnographic data
Those who attend this talk will learn how to use frameworks effectively at all phases of a study that uses ethnographic methods. Managing huge amounts of qualitative data requires a reapplication of techniques we already use as UX researchers. This talk uses examples from a 2-year ethnographic study to make concrete the ways frameworks can help bring user stories to the forefront, without sacrificing the objectives or richness of data.

Speakers

Friday May 19, 2017 3:15pm - 4:00pm
Room 1 - Backbay A/B

3:15pm

Find the Right Metrics for UX ROI: Identifying the Best Data to Show the Business Value of the Design
You have been measuring usability for a long time with task completion, time on task, and satisfaction rates metrics. Our friend Dr. Nielsen has been measuring user experience since the Web was born, so we have a strong foundation to lean on.

These measurements are the foundation of UX success – accomplishment! But it’s this focus where there some big gaps in the new world of measurement-driven products and websites.
What are the metrics that can tell me if a user experience is actually leading to ROI for the company?

In this presentation, we’ll go through a three-step process where you will be able to speak the language of ROI and identify new metrics on which to measure the success of your UX.

Speakers

Friday May 19, 2017 3:15pm - 4:00pm
Room 3 - Republic A/B

4:15pm

Student 10-minute talks
Speakers

Friday May 19, 2017 4:15pm - 5:00pm
Room 5 - Independence

4:15pm

Online Learning and Accessibility: Users as Learners
Online learning is booming. Users of online learning have one primary goal: to learn – for mastery, for a credential, for professional advancement, or just for fun. Online learners are not one-way consumers. They are active participants, communicators and demonstrators of knowledge. As they engage, converse, and share knowledge online, they rely on the features provided to them by online learning design and technology platform.

Persons with disabilities have become an increasing percentage of the online learning user base. In the field of education, accessibility experts have years of experience in understanding how students with disabilities use various modalities to read, write, think, and demonstrate knowledge. But we are just beginning to grasp how to make our online content accessible to students who are located remotely and connecting to courses via their own devices and technology.

In this presentation, I share current challenges and future opportunities emerging at the intersection of online learning, accessibility, and UX.

Speakers
avatar for Mary Ziegler

Mary Ziegler

Program Manager, Online Accessibility, MIT Office of Digital Learning
Mary J. Ziegler is Program Manager for Online Accessibility at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Office of Digital Learning. Previously, Mary led the Accessibility and Usability Group and the Assistive Technology Information Center at MIT. Throughout her career, Mary has been instrumental in creating numerous initiatives, collaborations and technology implementations each designed to increase access for students and global learners... Read More →


Friday May 19, 2017 4:15pm - 5:00pm
Room 2 - Backbay C/D

4:15pm

The pragmatic designer’s 'OCD' approach to UX Design practice
It’s a strange time for user experience. On the one hand, we have come a long way and are amongst the most ‘in-demand’ professions. Yet, many of us feel like second hand citizens in our own teams and organizations and we are still just trying to be heard. Many of us are feeling burnt out after fighting futile battles for user advocacy in our organizations. But can we avoid this burnout and be part of UX teams that find success in their organization cultures?
YES, we can. Just as a one-size-fits-all approach does not work for our design solutions, a single gold standard for the goals of UX in any organization and how we practice it is also not practical. So, we need to let go of our obsessive compulsions on how design should be practiced and instead employ an ‘organization-centered-design’ (OCD) approach for a more successful and fulfilling design practice.

Based on lessons learned from nearly 2 decades of working in various organization cultures, this talk will suggest some simple and practical UX team engagement strategies that can be put to immediate use in 3 types of organizations – Organizations where UX plays an optional/ advisory role; organizations with an established UX program and organizations that utilize design to influence business strategy.

Speakers

Friday May 19, 2017 4:15pm - 5:00pm
Room 3 - Republic A/B

4:15pm

Experimenting with New Research Techniques

As we collectively advance the field of UX research, 3 UX researchers present research techniques they have been tinkering with. Heather Wright Karlson is interested in the reactions of users at the conclusion of evaluation sessions when they reveal their feelings about their overall experience. Heather will share her emoji method to collect information about users’ emotions and engagement. Melanie St.James found inspiration in Journey Maps, typically used to summarize research. Turning the artifact on its head, Melanie used a journey map structure to conduct foundational research.  Erin Freeburger shares an alternative to a “shop along” where users interact with the FocusVision app “Revelation”, allowing the remote moderator to direct and respond as necessary.



Friday May 19, 2017 4:15pm - 5:00pm
Room 4 - Liberty B/C

4:15pm

UX Design for Vets
PTSD is a growing concern for Veterans and their families. About 1 in 5 Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans has PTSD or depression. This creates an ongoing need for clear, easy-to-use PTSD information and support. The VA is interested in improving their PTSD website to better meet the needs of their target audiences, particularly Veterans who have PTSD or are concerned they may have it.

To inform an upcoming redesign, the National Center for PTSD (NCPTSD) worked with [Company] to conduct extensive formative and usability research with Veterans with PTSD, their family and friends, and clinicians who treat PTSD.

In this session, we’ll talk about our research process from beginning to end, highlighting the voices of Veterans and their families. We’ll share lessons learned and address the knowledge gained from our human-centered design process.


Friday May 19, 2017 4:15pm - 5:00pm
Room 1 - Backbay A/B

5:15pm

Closing Keynote
Speakers

Friday May 19, 2017 5:15pm - 5:45pm
Ballroom

5:45pm

Cocktail Hour
Speakers

Friday May 19, 2017 5:45pm - 7:00pm
Room 6 - Constitution
 


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